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This Space shuttle Lamp,

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This Space shuttle Lamp,

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awilchak
7 days ago
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ok. yes. i want one.
Brooklyn, New York
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fxer
7 days ago
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Damn, amazing
Bend, Oregon

How much more terrifying could the murderbots be? Waymo.

jwz
3 Comments and 8 Shares
Dead-End SF Street Plagued With Confused Waymo Cars Trying To Turn Around 'Every 5 Minutes'

The visitors don't just come at night. They come all day, right to the end of 15th Avenue, where there's nothing else to do but make some kind of multi-point turn and head out the way they came in. Not long after that car is gone, there will be another, which will make the same turn and leave, before another car shows up and does the exact same thing. And while there are some pauses, it never really stops.

"There are some days where it can be up to 50," King says of the Waymo count. "It's literally every five minutes. And we're all working from home, so this is what we hear."

"We have talked to the drivers, who don't have much to say other than the car is programmed and they're just doing their job," King says.

"There are fleets of them driving through the neighborhood regularly," says Lewin. "And it's been going on for six, eight weeks, maybe more."

Much of the commentary I saw on this was people acting like it was some weird mystery, why would the cars glitch out like this. And an anonymous Waymo PR flack shat out some meaningless verbal diarrhea that amounted to "what we are doing is not technically illegal so you can't stop us."

But it's obvious what's happening here. Someone found a bug where these cars weren't negotiating u-turns properly, maybe even on this very street. So they added this street to the test suite, and they're going to run it again, and again, and again, until they get it right. Which is a completely normal way of debugging things when it's code on your own computer -- but is sociopathic when it's a two-ton killing machine on public streets, non-consensually involving real live humans into your process of debugging your buggy-ass software.

But here's something that might really bake your noodle. What if they aren't actually debugging code? What if this is not an edit-compile-deploy-test cycle at all. What if instead they're just training the network? What if their process is simply, "if we drive cars down this dead-end road ten thousand times, and they don't crash, we're just going to bake all of those runs into the network and call that whole 'u-turn' problem solved."

We're all going to fucking die, is what I'm getting at.

Previously, previously, previously, previously, previously, previously.

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awilchak
42 days ago
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oh my god this is so fucking stupid
Brooklyn, New York
skorgu
41 days ago
fwiw, waymo says the combination of disallowed turns and no-traffic streets. It's definitely a silly pathfinding but no sillier than any other GPS making an 'efficient' route that looks dumb from the outside (IMO).
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tante
43 days ago
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The idea that autonomous cars on the roads aren't being "tested" but "trained" is scary at best. People will die because Elon Musk wants to sell magic tech.
Berlin/Germany
Nezchan
38 days ago
This isn't Musk's tech. Whatever his personal faults (and there are many) the tech Tesla uses is much more robust than what Waymo is doing, which involves training street by street in a rote fashion. Which is basically rote training of their vehicles' AIs that doesn't take into account changing conditions, construction, etc.

Anti-vax family thankful they’ll have more leftovers this year

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VANCOUVER – This Thanksgiving anti-vaxx family, the Millers, announced that they’ll be giving thanks for all the extra leftovers after several family members passed away from Covid-19 this year. Despite the loss of her brother and in-laws, matriarch Justine Miller couldn’t deny the positives. “Hosting Keith’s parents was always such a hassle. I’d have to […]

The post Anti-vax family thankful they’ll have more leftovers this year appeared first on The Beaverton.



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awilchak
48 days ago
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praise be
Brooklyn, New York
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Tsp vs Tbsp

4 Comments and 9 Shares
It's like one teraspoon / when all you need is a kilonife
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awilchak
52 days ago
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grateful for these pro tips
Brooklyn, New York
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3 public comments
vahidakbar
38 days ago
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عکاسی صنعتی و تبلیغاتی در ایران https://www.studioemrooz.com/portfolio-item/عکاسی-صنعتی-و-تبلیغاتی/
vahidakbar
38 days ago
طراحی لوگو حرفه ای در تهران https://www.studioemrooz.com/portfolio-item/طراحی-لوگو-حرفه-ای/
vahidakbar
38 days ago
سفارش انواع پودر بندکشی در تهران https://www.sahand-chemicals.com/product-category/joint-grout/
vahidakbar
38 days ago
سفارش انواع چسب کاشی به صورت آنلاین https://www.sahand-chemicals.com/product-category/powder-tile-glue/
jlvanderzwan
50 days ago
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There's also "TiSP" but nobody uses that
Groxx
52 days ago
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At long last, making 1/10th of a recipe will be possible without needing to use a calculator
Silicon Valley, CA

When I can't log into my Microsoft account, to access the additional features offered by Windows 10, i get stupid. i go fucking insane

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When I can't log into my Microsoft account, to access the additional features offered by Windows 10, i get stupid. i go fucking insane




15298 likes, 1650 retweets
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awilchak
53 days ago
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same
Brooklyn, New York
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Poll: 71% of unvaccinated say booster doses mean vaccines aren’t working

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A health worker administers a COVID-19 booster vaccine and an influenza vaccine to an Army veteran at the Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital on September 24, 2021, in Hines, Illinois.

Enlarge / A health worker administers a COVID-19 booster vaccine and an influenza vaccine to an Army veteran at the Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital on September 24, 2021, in Hines, Illinois. (credit: Getty | Scott Olson)

Over the past few weeks, federal health advisers pored over data on booster doses for Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine and agonized over setting recommendations for who—if anyone—should get a third shot. Amid their deliberations, they continually noted an undeniable truth overshadowed their hand-wringing: no matter what they recommended, boosters will have minimal impact on the pandemic. Instead, the way to end the scourge is to have more people get their first shots.

After all the debate, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Friday overruled the agency's independent advisers. The director opened boosters to health workers and others with high exposure risks, in addition to the elderly and people with underlying medical conditions.

And today, new survey data suggests that offering any boosters may deter some unvaccinated from getting their first highly effective COVID-19 vaccine. A total of 71 percent of unvaccinated people said booster doses show the vaccines are not working as well as promised, according to the survey results published Tuesday by the Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF).

Boostless boosting

Splitting the unvaccinated further: of the unvaccinated who said they planned to "wait and see" before getting a shot, 69 percent said boosters show the vaccines are not working as well as promised. Of the unvaccinated who said they will "definitely not" get a shot, 82 percent said the same. By contrast, among people who are already vaccinated, 78 percent said the use of booster doses "shows that scientists are continuing to find ways to make vaccines more effective."

The results will likely be bitter for experts who continue to be torn about the use of booster doses at this time. On one hand, protection from COVID-19 vaccination looks to be waning for some, particularly older adults. In others, a booster dose may reduce the risk of infection and transmission amid the delta surge. But that elevated protection may not last long, perhaps only a few months. Meanwhile, for most people, the primary series of two doses is still offering high levels of protection against severe disease and death—the main purpose of vaccination.

Even CDC director Rochelle Walensky, who expanded booster recommendations over the advice of experts, notes the minimal benefits. "I want to be clear," she said in a White House press briefing last week, "we will not boost our way out of this pandemic. Infections among the unvaccinated continue to fuel this pandemic rise, resulting in a rising number of cases, hospitalizations, and deaths where people are unvaccinated."

Additionally, many experts argue third vaccine doses used in the US would save more lives if they were used as first doses in low- and middle-income countries. Many lower-income countries have not been able to access vaccine supplies and protect even their frontline workers and most vulnerable.

Deaths and politics

Another potentially discouraging wrinkle in the survey is that fear and first-hand experience of suffering appear to be the biggest motivators for getting unvaccinated people to roll up their sleeves. Addressing only people who were vaccinated after June 1, the KFF survey found that 39 percent said a major reason for getting vaccinated was the rise of delta cases. Additionally, 38 percent said reports of local hospitals and intensive care units filling up was a major reason. And 36 percent reported that knowing someone who became seriously ill or died from COVID-19 was a major factor in getting vaccinated. When asked what the main factor was in their decision to get vaccinated, the most common reason—with 14 percent of respondents—was knowing someone who became seriously ill or died of COVID-19.

By June 1, there had already been 33 million cases of COVID-19 in the US, which had killed nearly 596,000 people. Since then, nearly 91,000 more people have died from COVID-19—deaths that were nearly all preventable with vaccines.

In addition to fear and suffering, vaccination mandates and requirements appeared somewhat helpful in getting people to get their shots. Among people recently vaccinated, 35 percent said vaccination requirements for participation in certain activities, such as going to the gym, a sporting event, or traveling, was a major factor in deciding to get vaccinated.

Among the currently unvaccinated, about 34 percent said that they would be very or somewhat likely to get a vaccine if their employer required shots. An additional 15 percent said they would be "not too likely" to get vaccinated for an employer requirement, while 50 percent responded "not at all likely." If their employer offered an option to get weekly testing instead of a required vaccine, 56 percent of unvaccinated people say they would take the testing option.

Currently, roughly 75 percent of people eligible for vaccination (people ages 12 and up) are vaccinated with at least one dose. Nearly 65 percent are fully vaccinated. The groups with the lowest vaccination rates continue to be: uninsured people under age 65, Republicans, rural residents, White evangelical Christians, people ages 30 to 49, and adults without a college degree, according to the survey.

At this point, similar shares of Hispanic (73 percent), Black (70 percent), and White (71 percent) adults have received at least one dose. The largest remaining gap in vaccination rates is by partisanship, KFF notes, with 90 percent of Democrats reporting at least one dose compared with just 58 percent of Republicans and 68 percent of independents.

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awilchak
62 days ago
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Good times in US and A
Brooklyn, New York
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